National Schools Twenty20 regulations

To download this document click here.

For guidance on Duckworth- Lewis, click here

The Competition

Matches

For a schedule of matches please see the schedule document, and visit www.schoolscricketonline.co.uk for any updates.

Eligibility

All players must be Under 18 on the 1st of September of the current academic year. They must be bona fide members of the school, following a normal academic curriculum (eg AS or A2), and must have joined the school with the intention of completing two academic years. In exceptional circumstances, their eligibility must be confirmed by the tournament director, Andy Whittall. Any school fielding a player not eligible will be removed from the competition for the current year and two subsequent years.

The following eligibility criteria also apply. A School 1st XI will contain not more than three players who have joined that school for 6th Form education. A 6th Form College will contain not more than three players from outside their catchment area.

Entry fee

There is no charge for HMC schools entering the competition. It is covered by the Schools Cricket Committee annual subscription. The fee for schools non-members of HMC is £30.

Coloured clothing

Teams do not have to wear coloured clothing as the compulsory official ball can be used with white clothing as well as coloured clothing. The recommended (but not compulsory) supplier for cricket clothing and a sponsor of this tournament is Grays.

Match ball

The official pink match ball MUST be used in every match in the competition. Any side wilfully using a different ball – except by agreement between both sides in exceptional circumstances – will forfeit the match.

Tournament management

1) The tournament is managed by the Schools Cricket Committee. Each region has a specific organiser. Please liaise directly with this organiser in case of any query. Details are on the schedule on the website.

2) Dates for each round and specific matches are set locally by regional organisers and host schools.

3) The choice of playing knock-out matches or round robin games in the first round is the choice of each regional organiser.

4) Winners of each regional section will then play off to find the winners of each region (North, East and West Midlands, South West and South Central, South East & London) who will then compete in the semi-finals and final. See the schedule for further detail.

Host school’s responsibilities

1) To communicate with the schools involved in that specific round.

2) To arrange umpires (shared costs where applicable) and usual hosting arrangements for school fixtures. NB It is permissible for schools to bring their own competent umpire but only if agreed by the opposition, up to the regional finals which must be umpired by neutral umpires. ALL UMPIRES MUST BE ACO MEMBERS.

3) To make sure these regulations and any other necessary information are available on the day. This includes having a computer with the tournament spreadsheet available (inc. NRR).

4) Results

Full scores in the usual Schools Cricket Online format must be sent by the host school to the regional organiser as well as the editor for the Schools Cricket Online website (Douglas Henderson) by the following day. This is normally published on Tuesdays and the spreadsheet updated. Douglas is also the central co-ordinator for the competition and it is vital he be informed of all results etc.

This is the ideal format, using the nomenclature in the spreadsheet (ie, as in the heading below):

South London section group 2
Caterham 93-6, Eltham 94-2
RGS Guildford 101-8, Reed’s 104-5
Eltham 110-5, RGS Guildford 78
Caterham 83-9, Reed’s 84-1
Caterham 115-6, RGS Guildford 116-4
Eltham 151-3, Reed’s 126-5
Eltham win the group

Withdrawal: it is highly regrettable if a school feels obliged to withdraw from the competition but it is recognised that sometimes this may be inevitable. In such circumstances not only the other schools affected must be informed, but also the regional organiser, who may be able to do a re-jig of the draw. Therefore, as much as notice as possible should be given.

Playing Conditions

For the purposes of clarity, the competition will be played according to the ECB generic regulations for T20 cricket at non-first class level.

The Laws of Cricket (2017 Code 2nd Edition) shall apply with the following exceptions:-

1) Duration

One innings per side, each limited to a maximum of 20 overs.

2) Hours of Play

2.1 Start times are to be agreed by teams or directed by the competition organiser.

2.2 All sides are expected to be in position to bowl the first ball of the last of their 20 overs within 1 hours 15 minutes playing time.

2.3 Interval should be no longer than 15 minutes.

2.4 In the event of an interruption or delay during the 1st innings, the calculation of the number of overs to be bowled shall be based upon one over for every 3 minutes 45 seconds in the total time available for play up to the scheduled close of play. In the 2nd innings of the match, overs shall be reduced at a rate of one over for every full 3 minutes 45 seconds lost, unless the 1st innings has finished early or the 2nd innings started early, in which case no overs are lost until the time that has been gained is subsequently lost.

3) Rearrangement of overs due to inclement weather

The objective of rearranging overs is to give the greatest opportunity for a match of equal overs without reverting to a super over.

4) Over rate penalties

4.1 A 6 run penalty shall apply for each over not bowled in the required time, as determined by the umpires (2.2 for uninterrupted matches).

4.2 In reduced over matches the fielding side has a one over leeway in addition to any time that the umpires may allow for stoppages.

4.3 20 overs shall be bowled and the penalty runs are added to the final total.

4.4 Umpires are instructed to apply a strict interpretation of time wasting by the batsman (5 run penalties) specifically; batters are expected to be ready for the start of a new over as soon as the bowler is ready.

5) Fielding restrictions

At the instant of delivery, there may not be more than 5 fielders on the leg side.

5.1 For the first 6 overs of each innings only two fielders are permitted to be outside the fielding circle at the instant of delivery. Fielding circle to be 30 yards.

5.2 For the remaining overs of each innings only five fielders are permitted to be outside the fielding circle at the instant of delivery.

5.3 In circumstances when the number of overs of the batting team is reduced, the number of Fielding Restriction Overs shall be reduced in accordance with the table below. For the sake of clarity, it should be noted that the table shall apply to both the 1st and 2nd innings of the match.

Total overs
No. of overs for which fielding in innings restrictions in clauses above shall apply
5-6 1
7-9 2
10-13 3
14-16 4
17-19 5

6) Overs per bowler

6.1 No bowler may bowl more than one-fifth of the amount of overs scheduled for the innings. However, in a delayed start, or interrupted match, where the overs are reduced for both sides, or for the side bowling second, no bowler may bowl more than one-fifth of the total overs allowed (unless such a number has been exceeded before the interruption), except that where the total overs are not divisible by five, an additional over shall be allowed to the minimum number of bowlers necessary to make up the balance – e.g. after 8 overs, rain interrupts play and the innings is reduced to 12 overs. Both opening bowlers have bowled 4 overs. Two bowlers can bowl 3 overs and three bowlers can bowl 2 overs. Bowlers 1 and 2 have already exceeded this limit. They count as the two bowlers who were allowed the extra over (4 as opposed to 3) and so any other bowlers are limited to 2 overs.

6.2 In a delayed or interrupted match where the overs are reduced for both teams or for the team bowling second;

6.2.1 For innings of rescheduled length of at least 10 overs, no bowler may bowl more than one-fifth of the total overs allowed. Where the total overs is not divisible by 5, one additional over shall be allowed to the maximum number per bowler necessary to make up the balance.

6.2.2 For innings of rescheduled length of between 5 and 9 overs, no bowler may bowl more than two overs. In these circumstances, the one-fifth limit does not apply.

6.3 When an interruption occurs mid-over and on resumption the bowler has exceeded the new maximum allocation, they will be allowed to finish the incomplete over.

6.4 In the event of a bowler breaking down and being unable to complete an over, another bowler will bowl the remaining balls. Such part of an over will count as a full over only in so far as each bowler’s limit is concerned.

6.5 The allocation of overs per bowler will not be reduced as a result of the deduction of any penalty overs.

7) The Result

7.1 When there is no interruption after play has commenced and when both sides have had the opportunity of batting for the same agreed number of overs, the team scoring the higher number of runs shall be the winner. In the event of the scores being tied, the following shall apply:

7.1.1 If tied at the completion of a match, the team that has lost fewer wickets shall be adjudged the winner.

7.1.2 If this gives no result, then the team with the higher score at the end of 6th completed over shall be adjudged the winner.

7.1.3 If still equal, the side with the higher score at the end of 5th, 4th, 3rd, 2nd and 1st completed over shall be adjudged the winner.

7.1.4 If still equal, a one over per side eliminator (see 8) should be used to determine the winner.

7.2 For all matches if, due to the suspension of play after the start of the match, the number of overs in the innings of either team has to be revised to a lesser number than that originally allocated (minimum 5 overs), then a revised target score should be set for the number of overs which the team batting second will have the opportunity of facing, this revised method being calculated by the Duckworth/Lewis method (version of DL shall be prescribed by the competition organiser. If no agreement, Play-Cricket Scorer/PCS Pro should be used). A par score will be set for the second innings. If this is exceeded a win for the team batting second shall result. If the par score is equalled then the scores are tied.

7.3 For all matches, if a match is abandoned before it had been played to a conclusion and before the team batting second has received its allocated number of overs (providing that it has received not less than 5 overs), the result shall be decided by the Duckworth/Lewis method.

7.4 In the event of the scores being tied in a match when the Duckworth/Lewis method has been used, no account shall be taken of wickets lost and a One Over Per Side Eliminator shall be used to find a winner.

8) One Over Per Side Eliminator

8.1 The teams shall compete in a one over per side eliminator to determine the winner. The following procedure will apply should the provision for a one over per side eliminator be adopted in any match.

8.2 Subject to weather conditions the one over per side eliminator will take place at a time to be determined by the umpires. In normal circumstances it shall commence 10 minutes after the conclusion of the match.

8.3 The one over per side eliminator will take place on the pitch allocated for the match (the designated pitch) unless otherwise determined by the umpires in consultation with the ground authority.

8.4 The umpires shall stand at the same end as that in which they finished the match.

8.5 In both innings of the one over per side eliminator, the fielding side shall choose from which end to bowl.

8.6 Only nominated players in the main match may participate in the one over per side eliminator. Should any player (including the batters and bowler) be unable to continue to participate in the one over per side eliminator due to injury, illness or other wholly acceptable reason, the relevant Laws and Playing Conditions as they apply in the main match shall also apply in the one over per side eliminator.

8.7 Any penance time being served in the main match shall be carried forward to the one over per side eliminator.

8.8 Each team’s over is played with the same fielding restrictions as apply for a non-Field Restriction Over in a normal match.

8.9 The team batting second in the match will bat first in the one over eliminator.

8.10 The Umpires shall select a ball from the box of spare balls which shall be used for both overs of the one over per side eliminator. The ball to be used shall not be a new ball.

8.11 The loss of two wickets in the over ends the team’s one over innings.

8.12 In the event of the teams having the same score after the one over per side eliminator has been completed, the team whose batters hit the most number of boundaries in the One Over Per Side Eliminator shall be the winner.

8.13 If still equal, a count-back from the final ball of the one over eliminator shall be conducted. The team with the higher scoring delivery shall be the winner. If a team loses two wickets during its over, then any unbowled deliveries will be counted as dot balls. Note that for this purpose, the runs scored from a delivery is defined as the total team runs scored since the completion of the previous legitimate ball, i.e including any runs resulting from wides, no ball or penalty runs.

Example:

Runs scored from: Team1 Team 2
Ball 6 1 1
Ball 5 4 4
Ball 4 2 1
Ball 3 6 2
Ball 2 0 1
Ball 1 2 6

In this example both teams scored an equal number of runs from the 6th and 5th ball of their innings. However, team 1 scored 2 runs from its 4th ball while team 2 scored a single so team 1 is the winner.

8.14 If still equal, then another one over per side eliminator shall be played.

9) Wide Ball – Judging a Wide

Umpires are instructed to apply a very strict and consistent interpretation in regard to this Law in order to prevent negative bowling wide of the wicket.

Any offside or legside delivery which in the opinion of the umpire does not give the batsman a reasonable opportunity to score shall be called a wide. For guidance purposes, in adult cricket a legside wide should be called if a ball passes on the legside outside the pads of the batsman standing in a normal guard position.

10) No Ball

10.1 Law 41.6 (Bowling of dangerous and unfair short pitched deliveries) shall apply with the following additions:

10.1.1 Regardless of how wide of the striker a delivery is, there shall be no more than one delivery per over that after pitching pass or would have passed clearly over shoulder height of the striker standing upright at the popping crease.

10.1.2 The umpire shall make it clear to the bowler (and any bowler called upon to complete an over) and the batsmen at the wicket when a delivery within the limit in 10.1.1 has been bowled. It is unfair if the limit is exceeded and the umpire shall call and signal No ball on each such occasion and consider it as part of the warning sequence in Laws 41.6.3 and 41.6.4.

10.1.3 If a short pitched delivery either:

10.1.3.1 Passes or would have passed clearly over head-height of the striker standing upright at the popping crease, and in the umpire’s opinion so prevents him from being able to hit it with his bat by means of a normal cricket stroke or;

10.1.3.2 Passes or would have passed clearly over shoulder height of the striker standing upright at the popping crease, and in the umpire’s opinion he is able to hit it with his bat by means of a normal cricket stroke or;

10.1.3.3 Passes clearly over shoulder height of the striker standing upright at the popping crease and wide of the striker so that in the umpire’s opinion he is unable to hit it with his bat by means of a normal cricket stroke and, although not necessarily threatening physical injury, is deemed dangerous in accordance with Law 41.6.1, it shall be considered as part of the warning sequence in Laws 41.6.3 and 41.6.4.

10.1.4 A delivery as described in 10.1.3.1 shall be called No ball in accordance with Law 21.10.

10.1.5 A delivery as described in 10.1.3.3, if not a No ball, shall be called and signalled wide. (Refer Law 22).

10.1.6 Law 41.6.5 shall not apply. Any warnings applied in Law 41.6.3 shall be added to any warnings applied in Law 41.7.1 and action taken according to Law 41.6.4.

10.2 Law 41.7 (Bowling of dangerous and unfair non-pitching deliveries) shall apply with the following amendment:

10.2.1Law 41.7.3 shall not apply. Any warnings applied in Law 41.7.1 shall be added to any warnings applied in Law 41.6.3 and action taken according to Law

  1. 3 Free Hit after a No Ball

10.3.1 The delivery following a no ball shall be a free hit for whichever batsman is facing it.

Note: this applies to all modes of No ball with the exception of a short-pitched delivery that passes or would have passed clearly over head-height of the striker standing upright at the popping crease.

10.3.2 If the delivery for the free hit is not a legitimate delivery (any kind of no ball or a wide ball), then the next delivery shall become a free hit for whichever batsman is facing it.

10.3.3 For any free hit, the striker can be dismissed only under the circumstances that apply for a no ball, even if the delivery for the free hit is called wide ball.

10.3.4 Field changes are not permitted for free hit deliveries unless there is a change of striker or the No Ball was the result of a field restriction breach in which case the field may be changed to the extent of correcting the breach. However, in all circumstances, any fielder within 15 yards of the striker may retreat to a position on the same line no more than 15 yards from the striker.

10.3.5 The umpires shall signal a free hit by (after the normal no ball signal) extending one arm straight upwards and moving it in a circular motion.

11) Bowl-Outs

11.1 In the event of no result being obtained by other methods and where there is no reserve date on which to play the game, a bowl-out (outdoors or indoors) will take
place to achieve a result. Five players from each side will bowl two overarm deliveries each at a wicket (conforming to Law 8) from a wicket pitched at a distance of 22 yards (or the length of pitch applicable in the Competition) with, if practicable, bowling, popping and return creases marked (conforming to Law 7). The side, which bowls down the wicket (as defined in Law 29.1.1) the most times, shall be the winner. If the scores are equal, the same players will bowl one ball each alternately to achieve a result on a ‘sudden death’ basis.

The following shall also apply in respect of bowl-outs:

11.1.1 The same suitably acceptable ball (not a new one) will be used by both teams. If this ball becomes wet, it may be changed subject to the umpires’ approval.

11.1.2 If a bowler bowls a No ball it will count as one of the two deliveries but will not count towards the score of the team.

11.1.3 If the original match has started, then the five cricketers nominated to take part in the bowl-out must be chosen from the eleven cricketers and 12th man selected to play in the match. If there has been no play in the original match (the toss has not taken place), the five cricketers may be selected from any of the players in the squad as registered on Play-Cricket.

11.1.4 Each side will appoint a wicket-keeper to stand behind the wicket but out of reach of the stumps.

Practical arrangements

Umpires

1) There is no requirement to have neutral umpires until the regional final. Any competent umpire (but only if agreed by the opposition) is acceptable to the organisers. If it is necessary to pay for umpires, then the costs should be shared by the schools participating in each match. ALL UMPIRES MUST BE ACO MEMBERS.

Scorers

Each school must provide a competent scorer for each match. This is particularly important because of the calculations necessary in various circumstances.

Meals

Each team is responsible for providing its own meals. The host school is expected to provide light refreshment in the form of tea (to drink) and juice.

Balls

The ball used MUST be the official competition match ball (see above), but the cost of the ball will be paid by each team in each match (one new ball per innings). In exceptional circumstances (eg not enough official balls are available), then the same type of ball must be used in both innings, by agreement between the two sides.

Transport

This will be the responsibility of the individual school.

Semi-finals and finals day at Arundel

Participating schools are responsible for their own transport and accommodation, and providing a competent scorer, but all other costs (ground, umpires, meals, balls) are being met by the organisers. Meals will be provided for twelve players for each team, plus the scorer. Meals will also be provided for three members of staff.

Disputes

Disputes regarding results or any other issue should be referred to the organiser (Andy Whittall) whose decision on the matter will be final.

Andy Whittall
Douglas Henderson
Rob Morris
Mark Williams

February 2019